Big change for Singapore families revealed?

Big change for Singapore families revealed?

Singaporeans are increasingly family-oriented and concerned about their personal relationships with families and loved ones in the wake of the pandemic, according to a survey by Blackbox Singapore and FWD Insurance. (PHOTO: Getty Images)

Singaporeans are increasingly family-oriented and concerned about their personal relationships with families and loved ones in the wake of the pandemic, according to a survey.

In a recent survey conducted by Blackbox Singapore in partnership with FWD Insurance, 60% of Singaporeans said being aware of their personal relationships with family and loved ones is one of the good changes brought about by the pandemic.

A graph showing the percentage of Singaporean families who care about their personal relationships with family and loved ones.  11% for good, 49% for rather good, 33% for neutral, 6% for rather bad and 1% for only bad.

A graph showing the percentage of Singaporean families who care about their personal relationships with family and loved ones. 11% for good, 49% for rather good, 33% for neutral, 6% for rather bad and 1% for only bad.

The study focused on global mental health information and was conducted in 16 markets in Europe, America, Australia and Asia, including Singapore and Malaysia.

Although the study highlighted the positive family outcome for Singapore, the same may not be true for its neighbors.

Asians and family responsibilities

When asked about stressors that impact mental health, Asians cited increased family responsibilities and job stress as two of their top stressors.

Meanwhile, Westerners say they are more concerned about rising inflation and savings.

Additionally, Asians are also more worried about their family’s future than Westerners, with 27% of Asians citing it as their stressor, compared to 21% of Westerners.

A graph showing Asians are worried about increased family responsibilities, heavy workload and stressful work.

A graph showing Asians are worried about increased family responsibilities, heavy workload and stressful work.

In Singapore, however, the recent Longitudinal Singapore Early Development Study found that 41% of families said the pandemic had improved relationships between family members, and 71% of respondents spent more time together. .

The study was supported by the Social Science Research Council and led by Professor Jean Yeung, founding director of the Center for Family and Population Research at the National University of Singapore.

Prevalence of mental health

According to the Blackbox-FWD survey, 65% of respondents in Asia believe mental health issues will be one of the most critical issues in 2023. In Southeast Asia alone, one in seven people either about 14% live with a mental health condition.

A graph highlighting 65% of Asians believe mental health will become more critical in a year.

A graph highlighting 65% of Asians believe mental health will become more critical in a year.

In the latest Singapore Mental Health Study from the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), the number of people with mental disorders who did not seek help remains high due to various barriers and treatment gaps.

Difficulties asking for help

In the Blackbox survey, the cost of mental health treatment remains the most important factor globally (41%) and in Asia (40%).

Other barriers to seeking treatment for mental health issues in Asia include the following internal and external factors:

  • Difficulty talking to anyone (34%)

  • Not wanting anyone else to know (21%)

  • Uncomfortable help-seeking (28%)

  • Not knowing where to find practitioners (25%)

  • Not sufficiently understanding mental health issues (16%)

A chart highlighting the cost of treatment and the difficulty of telling anyone about their mental problem are key factors preventing them from seeking help.

A chart highlighting the cost of treatment and the difficulty of telling anyone about their mental problem are key factors preventing them from seeking help.

The survey also indicated that Asians tend to prefer the self-help route while Westerners are more comfortable discussing mental health issues openly.

Insurance options for mental health issues

With treatment costs becoming a major barrier to seeking help, having insurance covering mental health treatment could be a big help as 76% of Asians still want to explore insurance options for health issues mental, according to the Blackbox-FWD survey.

According to the report, FWD Insurance also creates tailored insurance products and publicizes their offerings through targeted campaigns.

Do you have a tip for the story? E-mail: sgnews.tips@yahooinc.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook, instagram, ICT Tac and Twitter. Also see our South East Asia, Foodand Games channels on YouTube.

Yahoo Telegram Singapore

Yahoo Telegram Singapore

Watch more videos on Yahoo:


#Big #change #Singapore #families #revealed

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *